Big Data Proves Bicycles are the Fastest Mode of Transportation

Regular readers of this site already know that in urban settings using a bicycle is the best way to get around. Thanks to an on-demand food delivery company there is now more evidence that bicycles are the fastest mode of transportation. The company knows this because their delivery algorithm takes into consideration how the food is being delivered to get the estimated delivery time for clients.

Smartphone data from riders and drivers schlepping meals for restaurant-to-home courier service Deliveroo shows that bicycles are faster than cars. In towns and cities, bicyclists are also often faster than motorized two-wheelers. Deliveroo works with 30,000 riders and drivers in 13 countries.

That bicyclists are faster in cities will come as no surprise to bicycle advocates who have staged so-called “commuter races” for many years. However, these races – organized to highlight the swiftness of urban cycling – are usually staged in locations and at hours skewed towards bicycle riders. The Deliveroo stats are significant because they have been extracted from millions of actual journeys.

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Bike Delivery Business on the Rise

Red Riding Goods is one of a few companies in Toronto that deliver goods via bicycles. In other cities from Mumbai to San Francisco bike-based delivery is nothing new and not all that newsworthy. Here in Toronto, where a crack-smoking mayor who thinks cyclists deserve to die advocates the destruction of sustainable transit solutions, seeing new business built around bicycles is great!

“My original idea for the business was to replace vehicle trips with bike trips. There’s a huge amount of money to be saved there, but to do that you have to change policy and behavior. It’s a lot harder than shipping coffee by bike.”

Featherstone is an independent franchise and one of the most well known faces of Toronto’s cargo bike scene. Abbiss likens her to the mailman. She bikes more than 600 km a week in bike deliveries alone using a beat up mountain bike and an old trailer, equipment she hopes to replace with a soon-to-be-launched IndieGoGo campaign.

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Sustainable Tiffin Delivery Arrives in Toronto

Many other cities already have tiffin delivery and now Toronto is one of those cities and here we have a triple-bottom line company rising fast.

She hires Good Foot Delivery and its developmentally disabled couriers for anything within the PATH walkway, otherwise she’s driving the meals downtown until the electric-powered rickshaw she ordered from China arrives.

Pabari, who was born in Kenya to Indian parents, hit on the business idea in her Beaches home while packing lunch tiffins for her son, who’s now 10. Pabarai had quit her six-figure, “soulless” job in marketing for a home-improvement chain after the 2008 death of her father and was re-evaluating her life.

Tiffinday has a triple bottom line: to make money, be environmentally sustainable and socially just.

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